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  • Gilead Sciences Expects Coronavirus Drug Data in Coming Weeks, Expands Access

    Gilead Sciences Inc. (GILD) said it is expecting to have initial remdesivir drug data in coming weeks. The experimental drug is currently being evaluated as a potential treatment for coronavirus patients.“Multiple studies are ongoing, and we are on track to have initial data in the coming weeks,” said Gilead CEO and chairman Daniel O’Day. “If it is approved, we will work to ensure affordability and access so that remdesivir is available to patients with the greatest need.”TipRanks analytics show out of 19 analysts, 10 are bullish with a Buy rating on Gilead stock, 8 are sidelined with a Hold rating and only 1 is bearish with a Sell rating. The 12-month consensus price target of $77.67 shows a modest potential upside of 6.6%. (See Gilead stock analysis on TipRanks) O’Day said that Gilead was making remdesivir available outside of the clinical trials and investigating whether it is effective as a treatment for COVID-19. Distribution of the drug will be under a government-approved "expanded access" program. Remdesivir was originally developed for the Ebola virus by Gilead.More recently, studies have shown it could potentially block the ability of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, to replicate. Until now, remdesivir has been given to more than 1,000 coronavirus patients, O'Day added.“With expanded access, hospitals or physicians can apply for emergency use of remdesivir for multiple severely ill patients at a time,” Gilead’s O’Day said . “While it will take some time to build a network of active sites, this approach will ultimately accelerate emergency access for more people.”Related News: 2 Biotech Giants in the Hunt for New Coronavirus Drugs Weekly Market Review: Stimulus Sparks Sharp Rebound Gilead’s Coronavirus Vaccine Candidate Shows Promise, Says Cowen More recent articles from Smarter Analyst: * Microsoft to Sell Stake in AnyVision Start-Up, End Facial Recognition Investment * Sony Says Coronavirus May Hit Profit Outlook, Delay Reporting * Billionaire Ackman to Trump: Build roads, bridges and tunnels when traffic is way down * Billionaire Ackman Says Pershing No Longer Has Hedges, But Cash For Stock Investments

  • How coronavirus could permanently change our lives, according to Goldman Sachs

    The coronavirus pandemic has come with changes in the way people live. Some of those changes will be temporary. Some will be permanent.

  • Goldman Sachs Picks 2 Stocks to Buy (and 1 to Sell)

    If anyone thought last week’s three days of positive trading indicated a trend reversal, or even more implausibly, an end to the recently launched bear market, they were rudely awakened on Friday. Markets tumbled as the US overtook previous pandemic hotspots China and Italy with the unwanted statistic of having the highest number of coronavirus infections on record. It appears, then, that the new bear market will be around for a while, along with the accompanying bouts of volatility. How long will it last? Impossible to tell, but the new reality means estimates and forecasts have been getting readjusted all over the Street, and investment firm Goldman Sachs has joined the fray. With COVID-19 restructuring the market, 5-star analyst from the firm, Heather Bellini, has been analyzing the tech names under the firm’s coverage and has reached new conclusions for a number of them. We ran three through TipRanks’ database to determine the rest of the Street’s sentiment. We found out that despite some reservations at Goldman Sachs towards one specific company, all are Buy-rated, with potential for at least 40% upside in the year ahead. Here are the details. Workday Inc (WDAY) Let’s start off with Workday, a large-cap software company. With a focus on the HCM (human capital management) market, the Pleasanton, California-based company offers cloud-based finance, HR, and planning system solutions mostly for medium and large sized enterprises. Despite surging in last week’s market renaissance, WDAY stock is down by 17% year-to-date. In fact, take another step back and the share price has retreated by 39% since notching an all-time high last July. So, what’s the problem? There is no problem, says Bellini. The 5-star analyst adds Workday to a list that meets all her current investing criteria. Bellini argues that in the current “challenged IT spending environment”, the company is well set up. As budgets get slashed, Workday’s potent combination of recurring subscription revenue, which amounted to 85% in FY20, and low churn with a 95% gross retention rate, makes it resilient in such times. Also playing into her bullish thesis, Bellini notes Workday’s expanding product portfolio could achieve further penetration with its “planning and analytics” add ons. The analyst said, “We continue to favor market leaders with a higher mix of recurring revenues and secular tailwinds from digital transformation initiatives and rising cloud adoption. To that end, while we do not think Workday will be insulated from COVID-19 and any corresponding impact to overall IT spend, we believe the company remains well positioned in its core HCM market where win rates remain high and well positioned to capitalize from growing cloud adoption within financials which continues to grow as a percentage of the overall mix.” Bellini reiterates a Buy rating on WDAY, but the price target is slashed from $223 to $158 on account of “contraction in peer multiples and increased macroeconomic risk.” Expect returns in the shape of 16%, should Bellini’s forecast play out in the coming months. (To watch Bellini’s track record, click here) Looking at the consensus breakdown, 13 Buys, 6 Holds and 1 Sell coalesce into a Moderate Buy consensus rating. The average price target is $200.25 and indicates potential upside of 47%. (See Workday stock analysis on TipRanks)Anaplan Inc (PLAN) Staying in cloud services, we move on to Anaplan. The company operates in a similar niche to Workday, helping companies streamline operations and make better business decisions through its “connected planning” offerings. With a market cap of $4.4 billion, the mid-cap is significantly smaller than WDAY, and has also taken a heavier beating in the pandemic-stricken climate. PLAN stock is down by a massive 38% year-to-date. It is worth bearing in mind, though, that following Anaplan’s IPO in late 2018, its share price surged last year by a market trouncing 125%. Clearly, the growth-oriented SaaS company has fans on the Street. Bellini is among them. Despite lowering year-over-year revenue growth estimates for CY20 from 34% to 22%, the 5-star analyst sees the company’s software as “best in class” and reckons churn will remain low due to “the strategic nature of its software”. The numbers are encouraging, too. In the company’s latest quarterly statement, total revenue grew by 42% to reach $98.2 million – including a 50% year-over-year increase in subscription revenue totaling $89.5 million. Bellini further added, “We continue to view Anaplan as well positioned despite an expected impact of COVID-19 on its results this year. We see its planning software as helping companies to become more well run and increase their agility as they benefit from a connected planning process. With a growing number of global systems integrators expanding their practices on its software, we see its ability to bounce back from expected spending dislocations faster than many others.” Bottom line, what is the implication for investors? Bellini maintains a Buy rating, but the price target is reduced from $68 to $51. From current levels, the potential upside is still a plentiful 56%. As for the rest of the Street, PLAN’s Moderate Buy consensus rating is based on 5 Buys and 3 Hold ratings. With an average price target of $51.25, the analysts foresee upside of 56%. (See Anaplan price targets and analyst ratings on TipRanks)Dropbox Inc (DBX) Compared to the two previous names on Bellini’s list, Dropbox stock has fared far better in regards to the coronavirus’ eviscerating effect. While tech stocks have plunged all around it, DBX’s share price has weathered the storm so far, with a year-to-date loss of less than 1%. Looking further back, though, since its IPO in May 2018, DBX stock has been in decline. Does its current resilience in the face of the coronavirus indicate a bottom has been met? Not according to Bellini. At Goldman, DBX gets a downgrade from Neutral to Sell along with a price target haircut – trimmed from $23 to $17. The negative sentiment is based on “contraction in peer multiples, increased macroeconomic risk and heightened competition”, and the new target implies further downside of 4%. There are a number of reasons Bellini cites as back up for the negative thesis. For starters, Dropbox is heavily reliant on SMBs (small to medium sized businesses). These are the companies that will be most heavily affected by the viral outbreak. Individual plans make up 65% of Dropbox’s paying users and 60% of ARR (annual recurring revenue.) Last May’s 20% price hike won’t help matters, either, as smaller businesses could move to cheaper offerings such as Microsoft’s OneDrive (bundled in with Office365), or another rival in an increasingly competitive landscape with lower priced alternatives. Bellini concluded, “While the new Dropbox does create the possibility to drive incremental subscriber adds alongside the ability to advertise potential upsell and cross-sell opportunities, efforts remain in early innings and we believe this ultimately expands the potential set of competitors in an increasingly crowded landscape. Since the February market peak, DBX has traded 3%-plus versus an average 16% decline across our coverage universe, and we believe risk/reward skewed to the downside from current levels. What does the Street have in mind for the file hosting specialist? 5 Buys, 2 Holds and 2 Sells all add up to a Moderate Buy consensus rating. Other Street analysts differ from Goldman not only in rating criteria, but in price targets, too, as the average price target hits $25.57, and implies potential upside of 44% in the coming months. (See Dropbox price targets and analyst ratings on TipRanks)

Travel News from ABTA

  • Coronavirus advice for customers

    Coronavirus advice for customers Full Page image sberesford@abt… Wed, 03/25/2020 - 07:09 Please be aware we’re receiving an exceptional volume of customer enquiries, which we are responding to as quickly as we can. Unfortunately, we cannot respond to all of these calls directly, so please check our Q&A below. ABTA Members are doing their best to manage arrangements for customers. If your trip is not imminent, your travel company may not be in touch with you right away. Our advice is to keep trying, though please do be patient.  Travel update On 17 March the Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) advised against all non-essential overseas travel for British nationals, initially for a 30-day period.   On 23 March the FCO advised all British travellers to return to the UK. General travel advice for travellers The FCO currently advises against all non-essential overseas travel for British nationals. British people who decide that they still need to travel abroad should be fully aware of the increased risks of doing so. That includes the risk that they may not be able to get home, if travel restrictions are put in place. For the latest updates please visit the FCO website here. Those currently in destination are advised by the Government to return to the UK now and should contact their travel company. They should also be aware that many destination authorities have introduced enhanced health measures including self-isolation procedures, and it is very important that travellers follow the public health advice relating to their local destination. Travellers should comply with these processes and take relevant preventative measures to reduce the risk of exposure. Travellers should also keep up to date on local advice. For full information relating to the Coronavirus outbreak please visit the Government website, Public Health England and the TravelHealthPro website.   Advice to customers seeking refunds and with forward bookings On 17 March the Government advised against all non-essential travel overseas, initially for a period of 30 days, which has effectively brought travel overseas to a complete standstill and led to hundreds of thousands of holidaymakers not being able to take their holiday.  This situation is completely unprecedented, and the Government is urgently reviewing options to introduce temporary changes to regulations that will create a longer window for repaying refunds without affecting the protection provided by an ABTA or ATOL protected holiday. Many customers have already postponed or rebooked their holiday or have received either refund credit notes or cash refunds from their tour operator or travel agent. A very important thing to note is that your holiday booking or refund credit note is financially protected in the event your travel business fails. Please see our guide on your options below.  We completely understand that customers may feel frustrated by the process of receiving a refund but we would ask for your patience and understanding at this incredibly challenging time.   Many tour operators and travel agents are doing all they can to help their customers but they have not yet received refunds from airlines and international hotels and without these they are simply not able to provide customer refunds, particularly on such a large scale in such a short space of time. ABTA has also asked the government to establish an emergency fund for customers, where travel companies can’t recoup customers money from their suppliers, which would help alleviate the situation further, we will update customers when there is news on this. We’d like to thank customers for their understanding, by following the steps below it will help to ensure that when this crisis is over UK holidaymakers will be able to book and enjoy their holidays in the same way as they have done for many years.   We would recommend the following steps: If your trip has been cancelled because of the change in FCO advice, talk in the first instance to your travel provider to discuss options.    If possible, postpone your holiday or travel arrangements, don’t cancel – this will mean you have a holiday to look forward to in the future, and it will help your travel provider maintain its cash flow through the short-term challenges.    If you are not able to postpone, your travel provider may offer you a Refund Credit Note instead of an immediate cash refund. This Refund Credit Note can be used to book another holiday at a later date and, in the meantime, it is protected by ABTA/ ATOL if your original booking had that protection, so you would be reimbursed if the travel company failed financially. Further details on this option are below: •  This protection will last until 31 July 2020 at the latest at which point, if you have not used the Refund Credit Note to book another holiday, you will be entitled to a cash refund. •  The value of the Refund Credit Note must be equal in value to the monies you have actually paid for the protected travel arrangements.  •  The Refund Credit Note must not include any other amount offered as a rebooking incentive or other offer.  •  Any such offers must be documented separately and are not covered by any scheme of financial protection. •  The Refund Credit Note must expressly identify the original booking reference and attach a copy of the cancelled Booking Confirmation / Cancellation Invoice and, where appropriate, ATOL Certificate.    If your travel provider has said they will offer a cash refund, please be patient with them as they process this: they are likely to be dealing with an exceptionally high volume of enquiries.   If you have a travel booking for later in the year, please be patient. The situation is changing rapidly, and travel restrictions are currently only in place until mid-April.  You may incur cancellation charges or lose your deposit if you make a hasty decision. Nobody knows for sure how long the current coronavirus pandemic will last, but we know that we will come out of the other side and we need to ensure that when we do, holidaymakers are still able to book and take their holidays and that there is a healthy and competitive travel industry to support them.   Coronavirus Q&A Q: What do I do if I have a holiday booked to depart after the current 30-day no-travel period (up to 16 April)?A: If you have a travel booking for later in the year, please be patient.  The situation is changing rapidly, and travel restrictions are currently only in place until 16 April.   If it turns out that FCO advice against travel affects your holiday, your travel company will contact you to discuss the options, at that time.  If there is no Government advice against travel to your destination, you’re free to make the choice not to go, but there's no obligation on your holiday company to give you a refund. Normal cancellation charges will apply.   It is highly unlikely that you will be able to claim any cancellation charge on your insurance as there isn’t normally cover for disinclination to travel but you can check the terms of your policy. The safety of travellers is a priority for travel companies, and their decisions will follow British Government advice. If you cancel now, or don’t pay your balance when it is due, normal terms and conditions will apply and you will lose your deposit or have to pay cancellation charges.  Travellers are advised to read the FCO travel advice for the country they are travelling to, which includes a link through to the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) TravelHealthPro website that provides specific travel health advice for countries. The Foreign Office also has a specific page with more information on coronavirus.  Q: I’m abroad already, should I return home immediately?A: All British tourists and short-stay travellers (this does not include permanent residents overseas) currently abroad should return to the UK as soon as possible where and while commercial flight options are still available.    This update reflects the pace at which international travel is becoming more difficult with the closure of borders, airlines suspending flights, airports closing, exit bans and further restrictions being introduced daily. Further closures to air routes may come in the next 48 hours, possibly without notice.   See further advice here.   Q: What happens if I have to travel whilst the non-essential advice is in place?A: British people who decide that they still need to travel abroad should be fully aware of the increased risks of doing so. That includes the risk that they may not be able to get home, if travel restrictions are put in place. Anyone still considering travel needs to be realistic about the level of disruption they are willing and able to endure, and to make decisions in light of the unprecedented conditions we face. Anyone planning to travel should check the validity of their travel insurance. British nationals who need to travel are advised to read the Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) travel advice for the country they are travelling to, which includes entry requirements and a link through to the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) TravelHealthPro website that provides specific travel health advice for countries.  As a precautionary measure enhanced health screening procedures have been put in place at arrival and departure areas in many countries.  Many countries have also introduced entry restrictions for people travelling from certain countries, travellers are advised to read the FCO travel advice and sign up to email alerts for the country they are travelling to, as these are subject to change at short notice.   Q:  What are my options for postponing a trip?A: As a result of the extraordinary situation and customer concerns over coronavirus, many travel companies and airlines are doing all they can to offer more flexible booking policies at this time, such as giving customers the option to change their travel date should they wish to postpone their holiday. In certain circumstances this may not be possible. Customers should speak to their travel provider to discuss what their options may be.   Q: If I cannot follow my initial travel plans due to the coronavirus outbreak, am I entitled to compensation?A: You won’t be entitled to any compensation, as the reason for the holiday not continuing is outside the control of the tour operator.    Q: My holiday is after the current 30-day no-travel period (up to 16 April) but I have a pre-existing medical condition and do not want to travel – can I get a refund if I cancel my holiday? A: As with the above advice, you’re free to make the choice not to travel, but if the FCO are not advising against travel to your destination then there is no obligation on your travel company to give you a refund. Normal cancellation charges will apply.  If your GP has advised that you do not travel, and provided you with official documentation to confirm this, then you will need to check the terms of your travel insurance policy to see if you can claim any cancellation charge back. Q: My travel company says it is giving me a refund but that I’ll have to wait. Is there a time limit on this?A: Currently, there is no hard and fast rule. If your travel company is able to provide a cash refund, please be patient. They are dealing with a huge number of customers, and with offices closed and staff working from home, it’s a real challenge. ABTA will keep an eye on the situation and encourage ABTA Members to do all they can, but it’s not unreasonable at the moment to expect the process to take upwards of a month.  Q: I have a package holiday booked within the UK, not overseas. Is my holiday affected?A: Even though UK holidays don’t come under the FCO’s advice against travel, they are very unlikely to be able to go ahead as planned. Accommodation may be unavailable, activities and bars and restaurants are closed. Therefore, we advise that you follow our general advice above, under “Advice to customers seeking refunds and with forward bookings”.  Q: I have a booking coming up for accommodation only in the UK. What is the position for me?A: If your accommodation is closed or can’t be provided, follow the advice above under “Advice to customers seeking refunds and with forward bookings”. If it is still available and you decide not to go, look at the terms and conditions to see if you are entitled to any refund or released from any obligation to pay. Q: What should I do if I have a trip booked to a sports event and the event has been postponed or cancelled?A: This depends on how you booked your holiday and what the terms and conditions say. If the event has been postponed, you should speak to your travel company about rearranging your trip once the new date has been confirmed. Advice for ABTA Members, can be found here.

  • ABTA warns lack of Government action on travel regulation puts UK travel businesses on the brink

    ABTA warns lack of Government action on travel regulation puts UK travel businesses on the brink Full Page image dhewitt@abta.co.uk Mon, 03/30/2020 - 09:43 Customers with cancelled holidays will face lengthy delays in getting money back if travel firms are forced into bankruptcy. France, Belgium, Denmark, Italy have all introduced changes to EU rules but UK government drags its feet. Following a lack of action by Government officials, ABTA has again written to Government Ministers, including the office of the Prime Minister, to urge immediate action to prevent catastrophic damage to the UK travel industry, and widespread consumer detriment. ABTA Chief Executive Mark Tanzer said:   “The global pandemic has put enormous financial strain on tour operators and travel agents, with businesses seeing a collapse in sales while facing immediate repatriation costs and refund demands for cancelled holidays on a scale that is unmanageable in the short term.   “These businesses are themselves waiting for refunds from hotels and airlines and without this money, they simply do not have the cash to provide refunds to customers within 14 days.  “Existing regulations are entirely unsuited to deal with this situation.  We want to avoid the scenario of normally successful travel businesses employing tens of thousands of people facing bankruptcy, resulting in holidaymakers having to wait many months for refunds through Government financial protection schemes.   “We are proposing some simple, temporary changes to regulations to buy more time for companies to keep trading, while ensuring customer rights are protected. Many European countries, including France, Belgium, Denmark and Italy, have already announced similar regulatory changes to preserve their travel industries and protect customers.” ABTA is asking the Government to recognise the unprecedented nature of the situation and proposes the following temporary amendments to the Package Travel Regulations: That the 14-day window for refund payments should be extended to a 4-month period.  That Government should confirm the ongoing protection of refund credits. That where suppliers (e.g. hotels or airlines) cannot or will not refund tour operators, there should be an emergency government consumer hardship fund to help fulfil refund payments. ABTA has called on the Government to take strong enforcement action against airlines who flout the law by withholding refunds due following the cancellation of flights. ABTA has also shared feedback from its Members on implementation challenges with the measures that the Government has already announced to help businesses though the crisis such as the approval process for Coronavirus Business Interruption Loans and scope of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. Notes to editors ABTA has been a trusted travel brand for 70 years. Our purpose is to help our Members to grow their businesses successfully and sustainably, and to help their customers travel with confidence.  The ABTA brand stands for support, protection and expertise. This means consumers have confidence in ABTA and a strong trust in ABTA Members. These qualities are core to us as they ensure that holidaymakers remain confident in the holiday products that they buy from our Members.  We help our Members and their customers navigate through today's changing travel landscape by raising standards in the industry; offering schemes of financial protection; providing an independent complaints resolution service should something go wrong; giving guidance on issues from sustainability to health and safety and by presenting a united voice to government to ensure the industry and the public get a fair deal. ABTA has more than 4,300 travel brands in Membership, providing a wide range of leisure and business travel services, with a combined annual UK turnover of £39 billion. For more details about what we do, what being an ABTA Member means and how we help the British public travel with confidence visit www.abta.com.

  • Providing support in every way we can

    Providing support in every way we can Full Page image dhewitt@abta.co.uk Thu, 03/26/2020 - 12:28

  • Principal pipeline protection guidance

    Principal pipeline protection guidance Full Page image dhewitt@abta.co.uk Thu, 03/26/2020 - 08:09

  • ABTA warns time is running out for UK travel businesses 

    ABTA warns time is running out for UK travel businesses  Full Page image landrews@abta.co.uk Fri, 03/20/2020 - 15:30 Urgent intervention needed to protect jobs and customer money ABTA is writing to the Prime Minister again today to urge the Government to take immediate action to prevent the collapse of UK travel companies that will result in tens of thousands of job losses, add significant delays to customer refunds and lead to long-term damage to the UK holiday market. The UK Government has announced measures to support airlines and airports but they have not acted on urgent calls from tour operators and travel agents who at the same time as seeing their bookings wiped out are faced with having to refund thousands of customers for cancelled holidays, as a result of the coronavirus outbreak. ABTA Chief Executive Mark Tanzer said:   “We’re running out of time, people are losing their jobs right now and some companies will be facing bankruptcy if nothing is done.  If that happens on a significant scale then the financial protection schemes for holidays will be placed under immense pressure and there will be considerable delays in customers recovering their money. The Government has said they will do “whatever it takes” but we need much quicker and more decisive action.”   Household-name tour operators and travel agents as well as SMEs up and down the UK are already laying off staff or asking them to take unpaid leave, as well as introducing big salary cuts in a sector where the average pay is already much lower than the national average.  Following the changes in FCO advice in recent weeks, culminating in a complete travel advisory ban announced this week, thousands of customers are entitled to refunds for their cancelled holidays.  However, most travel businesses have not received money back from their suppliers and many are unable to pay cash refunds immediately.  The travel industry is urgently seeking Government backing for a number of measures to relax the regulations to ensure customer’s money is protected, while giving travel businesses more refund options.    The industry is also calling for immediate cash injections to business, either as direct Government support for salaries or as underwritten loans, or both. The European Commission this week relaxed its guidance around the Package Travel Regulations, encouraging customers to accept credit notes that are financially protected, and other European countries are following this lead and changing their regulations.   ABTA’s key asks: 1. Financial liquidity The Government needs to take immediate action to:  implement a mechanism through which direct funding to maintain employment can be channelled to employers enable the provision of Government underwritten loans to businesses of all sizes, with the access mechanisms for these loans made clear, and allow immediate deferment of HMRC payments for a period of six months temporarily suspend Air Passenger Duty 2. Temporary changes to the Package Travel Regulations While we are not seeking to remove the consumer’s right to a refund, we believe that consumers will not see their money any quicker by enforcement of the current regulations. We are asking for the following changes to be implemented to protect both businesses and consumers:   That refund credits should be allowed as an acceptable and enforceable alternative to immediate cash refunds, with all protections carried forward as part of a ‘Refund Credit Note’.  That the 14-day window for refund payments should be extended to a 4-month period. That tour operators should not be responsible for providing refunds if these costs are not covered by the suppliers. Where those suppliers cannot or will not refund, there needs to be an emergency Government consumer hardship fund to fulfil refund payments. For further information, contact: 0203 117 0596 or press@abta.co.uk Out of Hours: contact the duty press officer 020 3693 0183 Web: www.abta.com Twitter: @ABTAtravel #ABTAat70 Notes to editors ABTA has been a trusted travel brand for 70 years. Our purpose is to help our Members to grow their businesses successfully and sustainably, and to help their customers travel with confidence.  The ABTA brand stands for support, protection and expertise. This means consumers have confidence in ABTA and a strong trust in ABTA Members. These qualities are core to us as they ensure that holidaymakers remain confident in the holiday products that they buy from our Members.  We help our Members and their customers navigate through today's changing travel landscape by raising standards in the industry; offering schemes of financial protection; providing an independent complaints resolution service should something go wrong; giving guidance on issues from sustainability to health and safety and by presenting a united voice to government to ensure the industry and the public get a fair deal. ABTA has more than 4,300 travel brands in Membership, providing a wide range of leisure and business travel services, with a combined annual UK turnover of £39 billion. For more details about what we do, what being an ABTA Member means and how we help the British public travel with confidence visit www.abta.com.   

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